Arnold Schultz

schultz-arnold

Professor Emeritus Arnold Schultz died on May 25, 2013. He was 92 years of age.

Arnold helped to created the conservation and resource studies major back in 1970 that today still exists at the College. He was a beloved teacher and mentor and his early research career focused on prescribed brushland and forest burning, quantitative ecology methods, as well as tundra and desert ecology.

Arnold is best known for his thought-provoking and innovative course in Ecosystemology. Through the Ecosystemology course, Arnold encouraged his students to think about whole ecosystems and inspired them to be fervent environmental educators. These are themes we still hold dear today at CNR.

The family requests that memorial gifts be sent to one of Arnold's two funds at CNR:

Former students are planning a celebration from September 13 through the 15th at the Woodland camp in Mendocino. A memorial service in Mendocino is also being planned.

For more information on these events please get in touch with Kathryn Baldwin.

--Written by J. Keith Gilles

 

--

Professor Emeritus Arnold Schultz is a well-loved mentor of the College of Natural Resources (CNR) and one of the founding fathers of conservation and resource studies at UC Berkeley.  His early research career focused on prescribed brushland and forest burning, quantitative ecology methods, as well as tundra and desert ecology.  Later he developed innovative undergraduate courses in systems ecology and plant community ecology and a graduate seminar in agroforestry.  At the heart of his courses was a view of the environment and resource management issues from an integrated perspective, blending hard sciences, social sciences, business, philosophy and culture.

Arnold is best known for his thought-provoking and innovative course in Ecosystemology.  The course exposed students to concepts in ecology, systems thinking and the pure pursuit of knowledge through essays, parables, games, art, humor and a pilgrimage to the pygmy forest in Mendocino County. Through the Ecosystemology course, Arnold’s students learned the importance of interconnectedness.  He encouraged them to think about whole ecosystems and inspired them to be fervent environmental educators.

The Conservation and Resource Studies program drew Arnold Schultz’ greatest devotion.  The program reflected Arnold’s core belief that an interdisciplinary approach to environmental    problems delivers the best solutions for nature and humanity.   And for more than 25 years, his CRS students have developed striking solutions to environmental problems by studying the interactions among natural resources, population, energy, technology, social institutions and cultural values.

Arnold has always taken a personal interest in his students and passionately believes in their potential to change the world for the better.  He imbues his students with an eternal optimism about the possibility of protecting the environment.  And many of his former students have done just that.

A good example is Norman Myers, author of The Sinking Ark and 11 other environmental books, and a leader in international efforts to protect tropical habitats.  Other students have formed their own environmental organizations, serve as conservation biologists and resource managers, provide consulting services to nonprofits, engage in environmental education and lead governmental agencies.  Arnold’s students acknowledge the impact that Arnold has made in the way they think and the way they approach complex problems.

Arnold received the CNR Teaching Award in 1991 and the University Teaching Award in 1992.  In August 1999, he celebrated his 50th year of service to UC Berkeley. Arnold now lives in Boulder, Colorado with his son and daughters and his dog Quincy. In 2010 he celebrated his 90th birthday.